News

CBC: ‘Shifting’ social norms playing a role in school violence, education director says

The education director for a Sudbury, Ont. school board says the education system, the home and society all need to play a role in addressing violence in schools.

CBC News has commissioned a survey of more than 4,000 young Canadians aged 14 to 21 by Mission Research to understand the realities of verbal, physical and sexual violence in classrooms.

Nationally, 35 per cent said they have been physically assaulted at least once in elementary or middle school. More than half (57 per cent) of teens reported being called hateful names. Almost half of the students (45 per cent) who experienced violence in high school say they didn’t report it to officials.

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CBC: Sask. K-8 students most likely to have been physically assaulted, national survey on school violence finds

Nearly half of Saskatchewan elementary students say they have been physically assaulted at school at least once, according to a nationwide poll on school violence conducted by Mission Research for CBC News.

At 44 per cent, Saskatchewan has the highest proportion of respondents to the survey who said that between kindergarten and Grade 8, they had been slapped, kicked or bitten at school on at least one occasion — putting the middle Prairie province well above the national average of 35 per cent.

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CBC: Student-on-student sexual violence highest in Prairies, CBC national survey finds

In the absence of reliable statistics across Canadian school boards, CBC News commissioned a survey of more than 4,000 Canadians aged 14 to 21 by Mission Research to understand the verbal, physical and sexual violence experienced in schools.

The results are sobering:

  • Nationally, more than one in four girls (26 per cent) said they have experienced unwanted sexual contact at school.
  • Over 40 per cent of high school boys said they were physically assaulted or threatened with violence.

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Huffington Post: Toronto Doesn’t Think Like the Rest of Ontario, Researchers Say

From the Huffington Post:

Toronto is often an outlier in terms of public opinion across the province on various topics, such as immigration and climate change, a survey has found.

Research conducted by Mission Research on behalf of the Mowat Centre, a think tank at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, found that otherwise, there are not many general differences of opinion across the regions.

But a main finding of the research is that Toronto seems to be different than other regions…

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Toronto Star: Toronto is often an outlier for public opinion, researchers say

From the Toronto Star:

Toronto is often an outlier in terms of public opinion across the province on various topics, such as immigration and climate change, a survey has found.

Research conducted by Mission Research on behalf of the Mowat Centre, a think tank at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, found that otherwise, there are not many general differences of opinion across the regions.

But a main finding of the research is that Toronto seems to be different than other regions.

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The Representation of the UN Migration Compact in the Canadian Media: Justin Trudeau vs. Andrew Scheer

TORONTO, ON – A new Mission Research media analysis project evaluates news media coverage regarding Canada as signatory to the UN Migration Compact. The analysis was conducted on behalf of the True North Centre for Public Policy. It focused on coverage of the relative positions and perspectives of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer in news coverage that appeared between November 1st and December 14th, 2018.

Drawing on a database of more than 150 articles and broadcast items representative of all major national and regional news outlets, Mission Research used a proprietary methodology, its Media Impact Analyzer (MIA), to analyze several key factors that drive the impact of media coverage including tone of reporting, article placement, and publication-tier.

Major findings from the analysis are as follows:

  • Mentions of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in coverage of the Compact were 41% higher than the number of mentions received by Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer.
  • Trudeau’s overall media impact score was -1.7; this means that Trudeau’s “pro-Compact” position was evaluated negatively, on average, across the 137 news items in which he was mentioned. 
  • By comparison, Scheer’s “anti-Compact” position generated an overall media impact score of -0.8, considered a neutral impact, across 97 articles of coverage.
  • Despite Trudeau receiving mostly negative coverage during the 44-day observation period (impact of -2.0), coverage of the PM was significantly higher on the day the Compact was signed (impact of +1.3) suggesting that mainstream media outlets may have been concerned with the ceremonial value of Canada becoming a signatory to the Compact rather than the substance of the agreement.
  • Though coverage of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau remained steady throughout the coverage period, Andrew Scheer was not mentioned in media reporting until December 4, about a week before the Compact was signed. By that date, a total of 29 mostly anti-Liberal news stories had appeared that mentioned Trudeau.

Notably, the highest number of negative bylines regarding Trudeau’s position on the Compact were penned by Sun Media columnist and Founder of the True North Centre for Public Policy, Candice Malcolm. In the absence of Malcolm’s bylines, Trudeau’s media impact improves by 55%, from a score of -1.7 to a slightly less negative -1.1.

In addition, without Malcolm’s coverage of the UN Migration Compact, CPC Leader Andrew Scheer’s media impact would have deteriorated almost two-fold, from -0.8 to -1.5.

Overall, findings from the Media Impact Analyzer show that both Trudeau and Scheer made critical errors in their media strategies with respect to the UN Migration Compact. In particular, Scheer would have benefited from taking a more direct and systematic approach to shaping the narrative at an earlier stage in coverage. Meanwhile, Trudeau should have taken a more proactive approach to his role as key spokesperson on this issue, taking ownership of the dissemination of pro-Compact messaging amidst anti-Compact reporting instead of leaving that responsibility to others.

For more information:
Lucas Marshall
lmarshall@missionresearch.ca
(416) 737-6419

About Mission Research:
Mission Research is a national public opinion and media research firm headquartered in Toronto, ON. Founded in 2000 by company president, Dr. Heather Scott-Marshall, Mission Research’s clients span a diverse range of public, private and not-for-profit sectors. To learn more, visit missionresearch.ca.

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Policy Options: What do Canadians think about trade and globalization?

From Policy Options:

With free trade in North America dominating headlines and ongoing concern over the rise of populism across Western democracies, it’s more important than ever for policy-makers to fully understand what Canadians think about free trade and globalization.

It is difficult to see trends and understand underlying attitudes using opinion surveys on trade, because surveys so often ask questions driven by the concerns of the moment. We sought to get to the heart of Canadians’ beliefs about trade and globalization through an analysis of a 2017 survey conducted by Mission Research on behalf of the Mowat Centre that replicated a set of questions from another survey conducted in 2001 by the Centre for Research and Information on Canada…

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Free Press: Western faculty demands job security; teaching assistants on verge of strike

From the London Free Press:

As the spring term wraps up, the University of Western Ontario Faculty Association (UWOFA) held a press conference Tuesday to warn that their members are fed up with the steady erosion of tenured jobs.

Pitel said the UWOFA’s push for more job security is backed up by a new poll commissioned by the Ontario Council of University Faculty Associations. The online poll of Southwestern Ontario residents conducted by Mission Research showed strong support for more full-time faculty jobs to ensure the quality of education.

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