News

Chatelaine: What young Conservatives really think about the candidates, Trudeau and “Canadian values”

From Chatelaine:

Conservative race 2017: Chatelaine asks young tories to dish on who they're voting for

“Energetic millennial” is not exactly what pops to mind when most people think of the Conservative Party of Canada. The Tories have always been known as the party of greying, sweater-vested, white dudes hyper-focused on tax cuts and paying down the deficit. (To be fair, Stephen Harper comfortably embodied that cliché for his entire decade in power.) That perception persists now, as the Conservatives gear up to choose their next leader on May 27.

The 18 to 25 set was key to electing Justin Trudeau back in 2015, according to one survey conducted by Abacus Data. This past February, Abacus checked back in with millennials and found 42 percent of them still favour the Liberals, versus 24 percent who like the Conservatives. Even more stark: another poll by Mission Research concluded that right-leaning political parties are among the least trusted government institutions in the eyes of Canadians aged 15 to 34…

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CBC: Cellphone in your pocket? CBC’s Marketplace investigates why you might reconsider

From the CBC:

The CBC's Wendy Mesley investigates a little-known message inside your cellphone's settings and manual telling you to keep the device five to 15 mm away from your body

For 20 years now, veteran CBC journalist Wendy Mesley has been tracking the latest research on cellphones. Her interest in this story is spurred by two questions: Do these things that we’re all in love with cause cancer? And have we been given enough information to decide for ourselves?

At the heart of this investigation is a message hidden in most of our cellphones and manuals that tell us “to reduce exposure to radio frequency, use a hands-free option such as the speakerphone and carry the phone at least five mm away from your body.” Depending on the manufacturer, that distance could be telling you to hold your phone up to 15 mm away from your body.

A survey completed for CBC Marketplace by Mission Research of 971 Canadians with cellphones asked how many were aware of the manufacturers’ suggestions to hold the phone five – 15 mm away from the body. The results showed 81 per cent had no clue, and 67 per cent admitted they carry their phones against their bodies…

Click here to read the full story

Click here to listen to the story on CBC’s The Current

Click here to watch the CBC Marketplace story on Youtube

iPolitics: Conservatives have a branding problem with young voters: pollster

From iPolitics:

Conservative partisans huddled on Friday to talk about how their party can attract a key voting demographic that favours marijuana legalization and thinks the government should handle economic problems — voters who not only react badly to the word “conservative” but who trust right-wing political parties less than any other organizations.

A new poll conducted for the Manning Centre shows that Canada’s youngest voting bloc poses a serious challenge for the Conservative party. But it also shows opportunities — places where the party shares significant common ground with young voters it could turn to its advantage…

Click here to read the full story (subscription required & recommended).

Hill Times: Young Canadians wary of conservative political parties

From the Hill Times:

Millennials trust conservative political parties less than any other institution in Canada, including rival parties on the left, all levels of government, businesses, and unions, researchers told attendees of the Manning Centre Conference in Ottawa last week.

An online survey last October of 2,000 Canadians between the ages of 15 and 34 found that respondents rated their trust in conservative political parties at 4.3 out of 10, the lowest of any group, while left-wing political parties achieved a 5.3 average ranking, reports the National Post…

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CBC: Want millennial voters? Conservatives must change, researchers say

From the CBC:

Researchers brought a sobering message to the annual convention of the right-leaning Manning Centre Friday: most voters under 35 aren’t connecting with the conservative movement, and if it wants to reach them, more than just messaging needs to change.

Making Conservative policies more relevant to millennials — a younger demographic not consistently defined, but most often referring to voters under 35 — has preoccupied a federal party that doesn’t want to sit on the Opposition bench for very long. Under interim leader Rona Ambrose, the Conservative caucus has been seized with this at recent strategy sessions…

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National Post: Millennials rank conservative political parties as least trustworthy, pollster tells Conservative conference

From the National Post:

OTTAWA — Conservative political parties are the institutions the least trusted by Canadians aged 15-34, researchers told a Manning Centre Conference audience Friday.

Young people, according to a survey commissioned for the centre, trust right-wing parties less than they trust all levels of government, left-leaning parties, corporations and unions, among other institutions…

Click here to read the full story.

Millennials say federal deficit and national debt are a “major problem”

The Manning Centre and Mission Research released poll results today that show the vast majority of Canadian millennials consider the federal government’s rising debt to be a “major” problem. The poll results are part of a larger poll the Manning Centre will be releasing at the 2017 Manning Centre Conference (Feb 23-25) in Ottawa.

Specifically, participants were asked – Which of these statements do you think best describes the federal budget deficit and the national debt?”

Respondents indicated:

  • 40% “Major problem – address now”
  • 42% “Major problem – address when economy improves”
  • 13% “Minor problem”
  •  5%  “Not a problem”

“It’s encouraging to see that millennials seem to understand they’re going to be left with the bill for the federal government’s rising debt levels,” said Preston Manning, Founder of the Manning Centre. “But the bigger question is what are they going to do about it? Speak out? Engage with elected officials? Propose cost-cutting measures? Organize demands for action through social media?”

“However millennials propose to engage, the Manning Centre hopes to assist them through our research, training and networking capabilities,” added Manning.

Breakdown by region:

BC AB SK/MB ON QC ATL
Major problem – address now 34% 44% 42% 43% 39% 35%
Major problem – address when economy improves 42% 44% 40% 40% 44% 49%
Minor problem 21% 8% 12% 13% 11% 12%
Not a problem 3% 5% 6% 4% 7% 4%

This survey was conducted by Mission Research October 11-19, 2016 via online interviews using a random sample of 2,000 Canadians aged 15-34 years. A corresponding random sample of the population would yield results accurate to within ±2.2 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Millennials support natural resource development

The Manning Centre and Mission Research released today poll results that show the vast majority of Canadian millennials support expanding the development of our nation’s natural resource sector.

Specifically, participants were asked – How much do you support or oppose expanding development of natural resource sector?”

The results showed:

  • 30% strongly support expanding development of natural resource sector
  • 51% somewhat support expanding development of natural resource sector
  • 16% somewhat oppose expanding development of natural resource sector
  •  4% strongly oppose expanding development of natural resource sector

“We sometimes see young people protesting the oil sands and other natural resource projects, but clearly they’re the minority,” said Peter McCaffrey, Director of Research at the Manning Centre. “Perhaps millennials understand the importance of natural resources to the future of the Canadian economy and their own job prospects.”

Breakdown by Region:

BC AB Prairies ON QC Atlantic
Strongly support 23% 39% 27% 30% 28% 36%
Somewhat support 55% 47% 57% 49% 51% 50%
Somewhat oppose 16% 11% 12% 18% 16% 12%
Strongly oppose 6% 3% 4% 3% 5% 2%

The results released today are part of a larger poll commissioned by the Manning Centre that examines the opinions of millennials towards politics and various areas of public policy. The full poll, conducted by Mission Research, will be discussed at the upcoming Manning Centre Conference during the “Millennial Mindset” breakout session (Feb 23-25 in Ottawa).

This polling research was conducted October 11-19, 2016 via online interviews using a random sample of 2,000 Canadians aged 15-34 years. A corresponding random sample of the population would yield results accurate to within ±2.2 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Mission Research introduces innovative research solution for evaluating brand health

Mission Research is proud to announce the launch of its innovative new research solution, the Total Brand Health Model (TBH). Drawing upon years of experience in measuring and evaluating brand health, Mission Research designed the TBH to account for a wide array of influencers, from customer/stakeholder satisfaction to the tone of social media mentions.

“Brand health can be a challenge to evaluate due to the variety of interconnected elements affecting it,” says Mission Research Vice President, Lucas Marshall. “That’s what we set out to address with the TBH; it accounts for all of the salient elements while producing easy-to-interpret and actionable results.”

The TBH is a modular index that draws from multiple data sources including:

  • Customer/stakeholder/member satisfaction and Net Promoter Scores
  • Employee satisfaction
  • Public awareness and impressions (reputation)
  • News media analysis
  • Social media analysis

Metrics from each research module combine to create the Total Brand Health Score, a definitive indicator of the overall health of a particular brand.

Click here to see the full press release

Click here to download the brochure

Millennials want electoral reform referendum

In a recent poll, the Manning Centre and Mission Research have found that 76% of Canadian millennials want a referendum on electoral reform before any changes are approved.

Specifically, participants were asked – How much do you support or oppose the holding of a national public referendum to approve any change in Canada’s electoral system?”

The results showed:

  • 24% strongly support a national referendum
  • 52% somewhat support a national referendum
  • 17% somewhat oppose a national referendum
  •  6% strongly oppose a referendum

“These findings clearly show that regardless of millennials view on what our electoral system should be, almost everyone agrees that a referendum is necessary to ensure the system’s legitimacy in the eyes of the public,” said Peter McCaffrey, Director of Research at the Manning Centre. “Although this poll is focussed on millennials, the results are in line with other polls that have found the vast majority of Canadians support holding a referendum before changing Canada’s electoral system.”

This polling research was conducted by Mission Research on behalf of the Manning Centre from October 11 to 19, 2016 via online interviews among a random sample of 2,000 Canadians aged 15-34 years. A corresponding random sample of the population would yield results accurate to within ±2.2 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Click here to see the poll results.